CERTIFICATE SERVICES

Written by Sam McGeown on 23/6/2014
Published under Microsoft, VMware and vRealize Automation
This is the first article in a series about how to build-out a simple vCAC 6 installation to a distributed model. Simple vCAC deployment In a simple installation you have the Identity Appliance, the vCAC appliance (which includes a vPostgres DB and vCenter Orchestrator instance) and an IaaS server. The distributed model still has a single Identity Appliance but clusters 2 or more vCAC appliances behind a load balancer, backed by a separate vPostgres database appliance.
Written by Sam McGeown on 9/6/2014
Published under VMware and vSphere
Derek Seaman’s excellent SSL toolkit. I know that there are hours and hours of work put into this script by Derek and I want to thank him for that – it’s a massive time saver. This modification is to fit a different set of circumstances – “standing on the shoulders of giants” – and should in no way be seen as me criticising or stealing Derek’s work. This week, while using the SSL Certificate Automation Tool and Derek’s script, I encountered a couple of things I felt could be improved for a more complex environment.
Written by Sam McGeown on 5/3/2014
Published under Microsoft and VMware
I’m fairly new to SRM, but even so this one seemed like a real head-scratcher! If you happen to be using CA signed certificates on your “protected site” vCenter and “recovery site” vCenter servers, when you come to linking the two SRM sites you encounter SSLHandShake errors – basically SRM assumes you want to use certificates for authentication because you’re using signed certificates. If you use the default self-signed certificates, SRM will default to using password authentication (see SRM Authentication).
Written by Sam McGeown on 5/3/2014
Published under Microsoft and VMware
I’m fairly new to SRM, but even so this one seemed like a real head-scratcher! If you happen to be using CA signed certificates on your “protected site” vCenter and “recovery site” vCenter servers, when you come to linking the two SRM sites you encounter SSLHandShake errors – basically SRM assumes you want to use certificates for authentication because you’re using signed certificates. If you use the default self-signed certificates, SRM will default to using password authentication (see SRM Authentication).
Written by Sam McGeown on 14/5/2013
Published under VMware and vSphere
It’s no secret that installing certificates from an internal CA is a pain in the…vCenter, but having just gone through the process of updating 3 vCenter installations with the 5-7 certificates required for each server I was asked “just why is it we need to do this again?” Why does it require multiple certificates for my vCenter server? In short, each service requires a certificate because it could feasibly be on a server (or servers) of it’s own - take this hypothetical design - each role is hosted on it’s own VM, and there are 7 certificates required - SSO, Inventory Service, vCenter Server, Orchestrator, Web Client, Log Browser and Update Manager.
Written by Sam McGeown on 6/11/2012
Published under VMware
The process of requesting certificates for vSphere 5.1 is a fairly grim, manual process. It’s repetitive and easy to make a mistake on any step of the way. Since I’ve got to do this for quite a few VirtualCenter Servers, I thought I’d script the certificate generation if nothing else. I am following the excellent documentation provided in Implementing CA signed SSL certificates with vSphere 5.1 and more specifically in Creating certificate requests and certificates for vCenter Server 5.
Written by Sam McGeown on 5/1/2012
Published under
I learned something new today: SCOM 2007 R2 certificate based communications not only checks the validity of the certificate you use, but also the CA that issued it…let me expand: Like many organisations there is a root CA (we’ll call it ROOTCA01), and then a subordinate CA (we’ll call that SUBCA01). OPSMGM01 has a certificate to identify itself and has certificates for ROOTCA01 and SUBCA01 in it’s Trusted Root Certificate Authorities.
Written by Sam McGeown on 29/6/2011
Published under Microsoft and Networking
It’s a fairly common requirement – setting up a guest WiFi network that is secure from the rest of your LAN. You need a secure WLAN access for the domain laptops which has full access to the Server and Client VLANs, but you also need a guest WLAN for visitors to the office which only allows internet access. Since the budget is limited, this must all be accomplished via a single Access Point – for this article, the access point is a Cisco WAP4410N.
Written by Sam McGeown on 24/3/2011
Published under Microsoft and Networking
SSTP or SSL VPN connections are great for people working on client sites or behind very restrictive firewalls – they only require HTTPS (port 443) to be open to be able to connect. Unfortunately, you need to be running Windows 7 or Server 2008 (or newer) in order to make use of them. Threat Management Gateway 2010 is one option for an SSL VPN endpoint. SSTP VPN Requirements Clients must be Windows 7/Server 2008 or newer Certificate – either commercial or an internal Certificate Authority Published CRL – SSTP clients check for the Certificate Revocation List of the CA If you already have an SSL listener (e.
Written by Sam McGeown on 13/12/2010
Published under
SCOM 2007 R2’s Audit Collection Services (ACS from now on) is very useful for meeting compliance (e.g. Sarbanes Oxley) and security audit requirements – working with financial companies often requires such compliance. It’s pretty simple to install in a domain environment – you run the installer to create a collection server, then activate the forwarder on the client servers. When it comes to servers you really want to audit, those that are by definition more at risk from security breach because they are publicly accessible, it’s not so straightforward.