DefinIT

Unable to connect NSX to Lookup Service when using a vSphere 6 subordinate certificate authority (VMCA)

After deploying a new vSphere 6 vCenter Server Appliance (VCSA) and configuring the Platform Services Controller (PSC) to act as a subordinate Certificate Authority (CS), I was unable to register the NSX Manager to the Lookup Service. Try saying that fast after a pint or two!?

Attempting to register NSX to the Lookup Service would result in the following error:

NSX Management Service operation failed.( Initialization of Admin Registration Service Provider failed. Root Cause: Error occurred while registration of lookup service, com.vmware.vim.vmomi.core.exception.CertificateValidationException: Server certificate chain not verified )

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Initially I thought that the NSX manager needed to somehow import the VMCA certificate to trust the Lookup Service certificate, however after reaching out to the NBSU ambassadors list I had a reply from Julienne Pham, a Technical Solutions Architect and CTO Ambassador with VMware Professional Services, who pointed me to the correct solution.

It seems that changing the PSC and vCenter certificates (even with the Certificate Manager tool) does not correctly update the service registration information. To quote VMware KB 2109074:

…the vCenter Server system uses a new certificate, but the service registration information on the Platform Services Controller is not updated

To resolve this issue, we need to use the ls_update_certs.py script to register the services correctly. (more…)

VCAC 6.0 build-out to distributed model – Part 1: Certificates

This is the first article in a series about how to build-out a simple vCAC 6 installation to a distributed model.

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Simple vCAC deployment

In a simple installation you have the Identity Appliance, the vCAC appliance (which includes a vPostgres DB and vCenter Orchestrator instance) and an IaaS server. The distributed model still has a single Identity Appliance but clusters 2 or more vCAC appliances behind a load balancer, backed by a separate vPostgres database appliance. The IaaS components are installed on 2 or more IaaS Windows servers and are load balanced, backed by an external MSSQL database. Additionally, the vCenter Orchestrator appliance is used in a failover cluster, backed by the external vPostgres database appliance.

The distributed model can improve availability, redundancy, disaster recovery and performance, however it is more complex to install and manage, and there are still single points of failure – e.g. the vPostgres database is not highly available and although protected by vSphere HA could be the cause of an outage. Clustering the database would provide an improved level of availability but may not be supported by VMware. Similarly the Identity Appliance is currently a single point of failure, although there are also options for high availability there too.

An overview of the steps required is below:

  • Issue and install certificates
  • Deploy an external vPostgres appliance and migrate the vCAC database
  • Configure load balancing
  • Deploy a second vCAC appliance and configure clustering
  • Install and configure additional IaaS server
  • Deploy vCenter Orchestrator Appliance cluster

(more…)

Installing VMware vSphere Update Manager Download Service and publishing via IIS

The vSphere UMDS provides a way to download patches for VMware servers that have an air-gap, or for some reason aren’t allowed to go out to the internet themselves – in my case a security policy prevented a DMZ vCenter Server from connecting to the internet directly. The solution is to use UMDS to download the updates to a 2nd server that was hosted in the DMZ and then update the vCenter Server from there. It also can save on bandwidth if you’re running multiple vCenter Servers, which again was the case (though bandwidth isn’t really a constraint). (more…)