DESIGN

Written by Sam McGeown on 19/1/2018
Published under NSX, VMware and vRealize Automation
vRealize Automation and NSX integration has introduced the ability to deploy multi-tiered applications with network services included. The current integration also enables a method to deploy micro-segmentation out of the box, based on dynamic Security Group membership and the Service Composer. This method does have some limitations, and can be inflexible for the on-going management of deployed applications. It requires in-depth knowledge and understanding of NSX and the Distributed Firewall, as well as access to the Networking and Security manager that is hosted by vCenter Server.
Written by Simon Eady on 27/5/2016
Published under vRealize Operations
As promised, I am posting the recording for the 5th Session of vROps Webinar Series 2016. Both Sunny and I successfully delivered the session on Design and Deployment considerations. Session Details:- In this instalment of the series, we discussed the steps and thought processes that should be used before and during the design and deployment of vRealize Operations Manager. During the session among other things we will cover the planning, core components, correct sizing, HA, clustering, DR and future growth.
Written by Simon Eady on 20/5/2016
Published under vRealize Operations
Time to announce the next part of the year long webinar series on vRealize Operations Manager. This time around, Sunny and I thought about discussing Architecture of vROps. To some, it might sound strange as for smaller deployments you might not have to worry about Sizing and Architecture much since it is pretty simple to install and configure a small or a medium node for a small shop. However as your monitoring needs grow and you start adding solutions for monitoring data sources beyond vSphere, you would need to think about scaling up or scaling out.
Written by Sam McGeown on 4/4/2014
Published under Networking
I recently got my hands on a copy* of Chris Wahl and Steve Pantol’s Networking for VMware Administrators and was very keen to read it – especially given the reputation of the authors. I came to the book as someone who is at CCNA level (although now expired) and someone who regularly designs complex VMware networks using standard and distributed switches. I would class myself as having a fairly decent understanding of networking, though not a networking specialist.