DefinIT

Unable to start PernixData FVP Management Server – service-specific error code 0

Having finally got some SSDs to be able to use my PernixPro/PernixPrime NFR license, I thought it was about time to get PernixData’s FVP 2.0 running in my lab again. I haven’t used FVP in my lab since it was running in beta, so I was keen to see the awesome new features in action. It really is an easy install process and took me less than an hour to get my cluster up and running with VMs I/O being accelerated.

That was Friday evening – over the weekend my lab patched, and when I rebooted my FVP Management Server, the service refused to start:

Windows could not start the PernixData FVP Management Server on Local Computer

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On checking the Event Log, it was as useful as a chocolate teapot:

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Next, I checked the PernixData FVP log files (located in C:\Program Files\PernixData\FVP Management Server\Server\log, or your install location). Within the commons-daemon log file, a little more useful information:

[2014-10-27 09:31:17] [error] Failed creating java
[2014-10-27 09:31:17] [error] ServiceStart returned 1

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At this point I double-checked the version of the Java run-time I had installed and noticed that it was the 32-bit version, rather than the required 64-bit.

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PernixData FVP actually installs the correct Java runtime when you install it. My mistake was that when I went to activate my PernixData license, I installed the 32-bit JRE in order to run the activation process in the browser – at which point my FVP service would no longer start. I completely removed the 32-bit version and installed the 64-bit JRE and the service started perfectly!

Blogger briefing with Satyam Vaghani – PernixData

Recently I had the good fortune to be invited along to a blogger briefing with Satyam Vaghani CTO and Co-founder of PernixData.satyamvaghani-304

Those of you not in the know Satyam already has quite the track record, more notably for authoring 50+ patents, Principle engineer and Storage CTO for VMware (10 years). So it is safe to say he knows a thing or two about storage and related technology!

Nine of us (bloggers) were in attendance. (@dawoo @Archie_Hendryx @Craig_Kilborn @GreggRobertson5 @dellock6 @egrigson @julian_wood @simoneady @virtualisedgeek)

At the time of meeting Satyam, PernixData was 2 years and 2 months old and already has had a large impact on the storage industry.

FVP was of course at the forefront of discussion and how it stands unique in the  storage market place by providing clustered read and write acceleration of any shared storage.

Satyam was very clear, he believes customers should be less focused on renewing/replacing your shared storage in an effort to maintain or improve existing performance but rather focus on simply increasing the overall shared storage capacity and scale out your caching system (clustered flash) to deliver that consistent predictable high performance applications and end users demand and expect. He also highlighted how right now the storage industry has never been more fluid, after 20 years of predictable changes and advances the emergence of SSD and flash has turned the industry upside down. Flash based technologies have already been proven to exceed the performance limitations of well known products like SQL Server where the code is now having to be reviewed to take advantage of the new speeds available.

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Reclaiming an SSD device from ESXi 5.5 Virtual Flash

| 27/02/2014 | Tags: , , , , , ,

After having a play with Virtual Flash and Host Caching on one of my lab hosts I wanted to re-use the SSD drive, but couldn’t seem to get vFlash to release the drive. I disabled flash usage on all VMs and disabled the Host Cache, then went to the Virtual Flash Resource Management page to click the “Remove All” button. That failed with errors:

“Host’s virtual flash resource is inaccessible.”

“The object or item referred to could not be found.”

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In order to reclaim the SSD you need to erase the proprietary vFlash File System partition using some command line kung fu. SSH into your host and list the disks:

ls /vmfs/devices/disks

You’ll see something similar to this:

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You can see the disk ID “t10.ATA_____M42DCT032M4SSD3__________________________00000000121903600F1F” and below it appended with the “:1” which is partition 1 on the disk. This is the partition that I need to delete. I then use partedUtil to delete the partition I just identified using the format below:

partedutil delete “/vmfs/devices/disks/<disk ID>” <partition number>

partedutil delete “/vmfs/devices/disks/t10.ATA_____M42DCT032M4SSD3__________________________00000000121903600F1F” 1

There’s no output after the command:

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Now I can go and reclaim the SSD as a VMFS volume as required:

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Hope that helps!